Oddities, End Dates and Some Dirt

The past couple of weeks both food pantries in which I volunteer have gotten large shipments of donated items from the county food bank.  These items are not TEFAP (Federal) or State supplied food.  They are strictly items donated by the general public to the county food bank through canned food drives or individual drop offs.  These sizeable shipments have been filled with many useful and needed items, like cereals, canned fruits and vegetables, and peanut butter.  They have also contained items for clients with health problems or special diets, like low sodium soups, vegetarian items or sugar and fat free items which are good for diabetics.  I have, however, made a couple disappointing observations that I wanted to share.

expiration dateFirst, most food items are now stamped with a sell by or use by date.  The majority of items are donated well before their expiration date, but at both pantries we have encountered items that were expired.  In several instances the items were several years out of date.  Additionally, we encountered severely dented or rusted cans.  Canned goods that were only a few months out of date or are only slightly dented are put on a table or shelf with an explanation as to why they are there, allowing clients to decide whether to take them or not.  Items that are well beyond their expiration date, heavily dented or rusted have to be thrown away.  My suggestion to people who contribute to a food bank or pantry is to look at the sell by date and the condition of the can.  This is especially important if the item is coming out of your pantry.  I know I have been surprised at how old some items are in my own pantry.  If the food item is either out of date or in questionable condition, please do not donate it.

As I mentioned, most of the items donated are useful and needed, but I have seen some very odd items as well.  Some of my favorites include a can of hearts of palm, Chinese Mabo Tofu Sauce and tamarind sauce.  All of these items may be quite tasty, but they are not something the average cook, particularly in rural Pennsylvania, is going to know what to do with.  Most foodMOST-NEEDED-FOOD-DONATIONS banks and pantries have a list of items they regularly distribute or for which they have a particular need.  I encourage anyone uncertain about what to donate to contact the local food bank or check their website to get that list of most needed items.  Some items that can always be used are canned fruits and vegetables, peanut butter, and unsweetened cereals.  Please do not think of the local food bank as a place to take unwanted items from your pantry.

 And now about the dirt.  No, the dirt has nothing to do with the donated food from the county food bank.  Today I got to play in the dirt a bit.  One of the food pantries where I volunteer has raised beds in which they grow vegetables to be distributed in the food pantry.  The broccoli broccoli seedlingsseedlings we planed today were supplied by the county food bank.  In addition to the broccoli we planted today, volunteers had already planted onions, radishes, cabbage, lettuce and carrots.  To augment the vegetables grown in the raised beds, some staff members of the food pantry will plant other vegetables at their homes to be harvested for the pantry.  I love this idea of the pantry growing their own produce and this pantry is fortunate to have the space to do so.  I am excited to think of all the fresh produce that will be available to food pantry clients later this summer.

 

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